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Ivanka Trump: We must foster economic opportunity in Latin America

Ivanka Trump: We must foster economic opportunity in Latin America Ivanka Trump said she agrees with liberals and conservatives who think it’s important to help foster stability and spark economic growth throughout Central America and South America — as the U.S. is engaged in a passionate debate over immigration policy.


Trump calls for deporting illegal immigrants with 'no judges or court cases'

Trump calls for deporting illegal immigrants with 'no judges or court cases' President Donald Trump said on Sunday that people who enter the United States illegally should be sent back to where they came from immediately without any judicial process. Facing a public outcry and pressure even from within his Republican Party, Trump last week reversed his policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the border so the adults could be detained and prosecuted, a process that typically takes months. Since buckling on the issue on Wednesday, Trump has redoubled his criticism of U.S. immigration laws on Twitter and in speeches where he likened illegal immigrants to invaders trying to "break into" the country.


Supreme Court poised to rule on Trump travel ban, other cases

Supreme Court poised to rule on Trump travel ban, other cases The U.S. Supreme Court, winding down its nine-month term, will issue rulings this week in its few remaining cases including a major one on the legality of President Donald Trump's ban on people from five Muslim-majority nations entering the country. The nine justices are due to decide other politically sensitive cases on whether non-union workers have to pay fees to unions representing certain public-sector workers such as police and teachers, and the legality of California regulations on clinics that steer women with unplanned pregnancies away from abortion. The travel ban case was argued on April 25, with the court's conservative majority signaling support for Trump's policy in a significant test of presidential powers.


Mistrial declared in Houston chokehold case

Mistrial declared in Houston chokehold case A mistrial was declared after jurors in Houston failed to reach a verdict late Saturday in the murder trial of the husband of a sheriff's deputy accused of choking a Hispanic man in a case that spurred "Brown Lives Matter" protests, local media reported. After more than 26 hours of deliberation, Houston jurors could not agree if Terry Thompson, 42, was guilty over the death of John Hernandez 24, in a chokehold in May, 2017. Thompson is the husband of former Harris County Sheriff's Deputy Chauna Thompson, 46.


U.S. says still working to reunite 2,053 children with families

U.S. says still working to reunite 2,053 children with families By Yeganeh Torbati WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. government said it still had 2,053 children in its custody who were separated from their parents under President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, and set out its most detailed plans yet on how it would reunite families. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said late on Saturday it had a "well coordinated" process in place - in the face of criticism from lawyers for parents and children who have said they have seen little evidence of an organized system. A total of 522 children had already been reunited with parents, the agency added in a fact sheet published three days after Trump ended his policy of separating families on the U.S.-Mexico border, after images of youngsters in cages triggered outrage at home and abroad.


South Carolina congressional candidate seriously injured in car crash

South Carolina congressional candidate seriously injured in car crash South Carolina Republican congressional candidate Katie Arrington, who ousted incumbent U.S. Representative Mark Sanford in a primary this month, was seriously injured in a car crash that killed the driver of a second vehicle, her campaign said on Saturday. Arrington, 47, was the passenger in a car driven by a friend on Friday night when a vehicle traveling in the wrong direction struck them on Highway 17 in Charleston County as they were going to Hilton Head where Arrington was to receive an award from a state medical organization, her campaign said. Campaign spokesman Michael Mule said Arrington will definitely stay in the race for Congress.


Trump defends policies on border, North Korea in visit to Las Vegas

Trump defends policies on border, North Korea in visit to Las Vegas President Donald Trump defended his tough stance on immigrants crossing the U.S. border with Mexico on Saturday, praising his administration for a job well done and saying his approach will make the United States stronger. Trump also said his peace initiative with North Korea was already paying off despite criticism that his Singapore summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un earlier this month was long on positive imagery but short on specific accomplishments. Trump, who was in Las Vegas to lend support to U.S. Senator Dean Heller of Nevada, a Republican who is facing a stiff challenge to re-election, has been under fire for a policy that separates children from their parents when they illegally cross the U.S. border with Mexico.


South Carolina congressional candidate seriously injured in car crash

South Carolina congressional candidate seriously injured in car crash South Carolina Republican congressional candidate Katie Arrington, who ousted incumbent U.S. Representative Mark Sanford in a primary this month, was seriously injured in a car crash that killed the driver of a second vehicle, her campaign said on Saturday. Arrington, 47, was the passenger in a car driven by a friend on Friday night when a vehicle traveling in the wrong direction struck them on Highway 17 in Charleston County as they were going to Hilton Head where Arrington was to receive an award from a state medical organization, her campaign said. Tim Scott, a Republican U.S. Senator from South Carolina, told the News & Courier newspaper in Charleston that he visited Arrington on Saturday and spoke with her.


White House press secretary says asked to leave restaurant for working for Trump

White House press secretary says asked to leave restaurant for working for Trump White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said on Saturday that she had been asked to leave a Virginia restaurant the night before because she worked for U.S. President Donald Trump. "Last night I was told by the owner of Red Hen in Lexington, VA to leave because I work for @POTUS and I politely left," Sanders said on the official Press Secretary Twitter account. On Saturday, the owner of the Red Hen confirmed the incident and said she stood by her decision to refuse service to Sanders, the Washington Post reported.


Readers write: Young reporters cover March for Our Lives

Readers write: Young reporters cover March for Our Lives Regarding the March 26 article “What the March for Our Lives looked like through the eyes of young reporters” (CSMonitor.com): Bravo to the Monitor for sending this group of two college students and three recent college graduates. Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? It is a relief that they did not follow the agenda of some news organizations who painted it as a political event.


No drugs in U.S. celebrity chef Bourdain's body when he died: prosecutor

No drugs in U.S. celebrity chef Bourdain's body when he died: prosecutor (This version of the June 22 story was corrected to show traces of alcohol, medicines were found) PARIS (Reuters) - U.S. celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain, who killed himself in a French hotel room earlier this month, had no narcotics in his body when he died, a local prosecutor said on Friday. Bourdain, host of CNN's food-and-travel-focused "Parts Unknown" television series, was 61. Trace of alcohol," he said, listing the findings of the investigation.


Four arrested in Pittsburgh as protest calls for justice after police shooting

Four arrested in Pittsburgh as protest calls for justice after police shooting Police made four arrests during the hours-long demonstration that wound through the streets of the Steel City as hundreds of protesters blocked intersections and major thoroughfares, disrupting rush-hour and Friday-night traffic, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and a CNN affiliate reported. Protesters have taken to the streets nightly this week since Antwon Rose, 17, was shot and killed by an East Pittsburgh police officer as he ran from a vehicle after it was stopped by police who were searching for a suspect in an earlier drive-by shooting. Friday's protest stopped at one point in front of PNC Park where Major League Baseball's Pittsburgh Pirates played the Arizona Diamondbacks.


Prison shares rise as U.S. eyes more migrant family detention space

Prison shares rise as U.S. eyes more migrant family detention space By Sinéad Carew and April Joyner (Reuters) - Shares in private prison operators CoreCivic Inc and Geo Group rose on Friday as investors bet on increasing demand for their services after U.S. authorities asked about available capacity for the detention of immigrant families. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) issued a request for information on Friday afternoon about potential facilities from different providers to accommodate up to 15,000 beds, ideally in several locations. The move came after U.S. President Donald Trump issued an executive order on Wednesday aimed at ending his controversial policy of separating immigrant children from their parents caught entering the country illegally.


Parted at U.S. border by Trump policy, migrants seek their children

Parted at U.S. border by Trump policy, migrants seek their children SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Lilian Merida-Galicia and her 7-year-old daughter were apprehended after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona and separated by U.S. officials in mid-May. Since then, the 23-year-old Guatemalan has been trying to learn her daughter's whereabouts, according to her attorney, Michael Avenatti. At one point she sent a note to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).


U.S. Navy drafts plans to house 25,000 immigrants at cost of $233 million

U.S. Navy drafts plans to house 25,000 immigrants at cost of $233 million By Idrees Ali WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Navy is drafting plans to house up to 25,000 immigrants on its bases and other facilities, at an estimated cost of about $233 million over six months, as the Trump administration seeks to ease a mounting crisis on the Mexican border, a U.S. official said on Friday. The official, who asked not to be named, stressed that the draft memo, which looks at setting up housing on Navy airfields in Alabama, was for planning purposes only. President Donald Trump is facing a public outcry over his policy of separating children from their migrant parents, with lawmakers struggling to get immigration legislation passed.


White House accuses Democrats and media of exploiting toddler photo

White House accuses Democrats and media of exploiting toddler photo (Reuters) - After weeks of criticism over the separation of immigrant families, the White House seized on a photo of a Honduran toddler seen sobbing at the U.S.-Mexican border to accuse Democrats and the media on Friday of exploiting the picture to push their agenda on immigration. The photograph, taken by photographer John Moore at the scene of a border detention this month, became a powerful image in the media coverage of the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexican border. Dozens of newspapers and magazines including Time and the Washington Post published the image.


Mexican airline Volaris offers free flights for separated children

Mexican airline Volaris offers free flights for separated children Mexican airline Volaris said on Friday it was offering free flights to reunite families separated by the "zero tolerance" immigration policy of U.S. President Donald Trump. "It hurts us to see these children without their parents and it is our vocation to reunite them," Volaris said in a statement. The airline said it would work with authorities in the United States, Mexico and Central America to offer free flights on its pre-existing routes to reunite children with their parents.


Octogenarian New England ex-mob boss convicted of 1993 murder

Octogenarian New England ex-mob boss convicted of 1993 murder A federal jury on Friday found a former boss of the New England mob and one of his associates guilty of the 1993 murder of a nightclub owner whose remains were discovered buried in Rhode Island two years ago. Jurors in Boston convicted Francis "Cadillac Frank" Salemme, 84, and Paul Weadick, 63, of killing club owner Steven DiSarro because they believed he would cooperate with federal investigators. Steven Boozang, Salemme's lawyer, said he was disappointed and plans to appeal.


U.S. judge says may rule next week on reuniting migrant children

U.S. judge says may rule next week on reuniting migrant children A federal judge said on Friday he could rule as soon as the middle of next week on a request to order the U.S. government to reunite thousands of immigrant children who were separated from their parents after illegally crossing the Mexico-U.S. border. While U.S. President Donald Trump bowed to political pressure on Wednesday and issued an executive order ending the separations, the administration has been silent on plans to reunite parents split from their children. More than 2,300 migrant children have been separated since the Trump administration began a "zero tolerance" policy toward illegal border crossings in early May. At a court hearing on Friday, a lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union pressed U.S. District Court Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego to issue an injunction as soon as Friday evening to force the government to begin reuniting families.


Prison shares rise as U.S. eyes more migrant family detention space

Prison shares rise as U.S. eyes more migrant family detention space The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's office of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) issued a request for information on Friday afternoon about potential facilities from different providers to accommodate up to 15,000 beds, ideally in several locations. The move came after U.S. President Donald Trump issued an executive order on Wednesday aimed at ending his controversial policy of separating immigrant children from their parents caught entering the country illegally.


Mexican airline Volaris offers free flights for separated children

Mexican airline Volaris offers free flights for separated children Mexican airline Volaris said on Friday it was offering free flights to reunite families separated by the "zero tolerance" immigration policy of U.S. President Donald Trump. "It hurts us to see these children without their parents and it is our vocation to reunite them," Volaris said in a statement. The airline said it would work with authorities in the United States, Mexico and Central America to offer free flights on its pre-existing routes to reunite children with their parents.


White House accuses Democrats and media of exploiting toddler photo

White House accuses Democrats and media of exploiting toddler photo The photograph, taken by photographer John Moore at the scene of a border detention this month, became a powerful image in the media coverage of the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexican border. Dozens of newspapers and magazines including Time and the Washington Post published the image. The image, widely seen as showing the girl crying over being parted from her mother, helped swell outrage at home and abroad that pushed President Donald Trump to back down on Wednesday on his administration's policy of separating children from their families while the adults were prosecuted for illegally crossing the border.


Accused N.Y attacker says U.S. court's judgment 'not important'

Accused N.Y attacker says U.S. court's judgment 'not important' The Uzbek national accused of killing eight people by driving a speeding truck along a New York City bike path last October spoke of a "war" led by Islamic State at a pre-trial hearing on Friday and dismissed the court's judgment as not important. The statement by Sayfullo Saipov, a legal permanent resident of the United States, came at the end of a hearing at which U.S. District Judge Vernon Broderick set an Oct. 7, 2019, trial date in the case. "The Islamic State, in order to impose sharia (Islamic law) on Earth, is leading a war," Saipov said.


President Trump's empathy-free week

President Trump's empathy-free week This week in Trump’s America, the White House struggled to answer a simple question: Don't you have any empathy?


Cell signal: What high court ruling may mean for future of digital privacy

Cell signal: What high court ruling may mean for future of digital privacy In a 5-to-4 decision today, the US Supreme Court updated privacy protections in the digital age, ruling that historic location data collected by from individual cellphones is protected by the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. Given the routine advancement in communications technologies, especially in recent years with the proliferation of smartphones, the Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches by the government has been one of the most routinely reinterpreted constitutional amendments. The decision this morning – in which Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the court’s four left-leaning justices – continues that trend, and reinforces suspicions the high court has voiced in the past about how rapid technological advancements could implicate personal privacy.


Octogenarian New England ex-mob boss convicted of 1993 murder

Octogenarian New England ex-mob boss convicted of 1993 murder A federal jury on Friday found a former boss of the New England mob and one of his associates guilty of the 1993 murder of a nightclub owner whose remains were discovered buried in Rhode Island two years ago. Jurors in Boston convicted Francis "Cadillac Frank" Salemme, 84, and Paul Weadick, 63, of killing club owner Steven DiSarro because they believed he would cooperate with federal investigators. Steven Boozang, Salemme's lawyer, said he was disappointed and plans to appeal.


From the 'Northern Triangle' to the Rio Grande: Violence, poverty and disasters drive migration

From the 'Northern Triangle' to the Rio Grande: Violence, poverty and disasters drive migration The majority of families crossing the southwestern U.S. border are from the Northern Triangle of Central America — El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala — and many are fleeing violence and poverty.


Trump urges Republican lawmakers to drop immigration bill until election

Trump urges Republican lawmakers to drop immigration bill until election By Doina Chiacu and Richard Cowan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Donald Trump urged Republican lawmakers on Friday to drop their efforts to pass comprehensive immigration legislation until after the November elections, sending mixed signals to his party amid an ongoing crisis over his border policies. Trump, faced with a public outcry over his policy that separated children from their migrant parents at the U.S. border with Mexico, has gone back and forth on ways to solve the country's immigration problems, which he blames on Democrats.


Turkey election: Does Kurdish leader jailed as 'terrorist' hold the key?

Turkey election: Does Kurdish leader jailed as 'terrorist' hold the key? State broadcaster TRT set up a makeshift studio so that imprisoned Kurdish presidential candidate Selahattin Demirtaş could make a 10-minute address to the nation, as allotted by election law. Turks vote Sunday in a landmark election that will determine whether 16 years of rule by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his Justice and Development Party (AKP) will continue. Recommended: Think you know Turkey?


A nonviolent movement challenges Pakistan’s military

A nonviolent movement challenges Pakistan’s military In countries where military figures still hold the reins of power through fear, such as Egypt or Thailand, public criticism of the regime comes mainly from abroad. In recent days, for example, the United Nations has accused Venezuela’s security forces of hundreds of arbitrary killings. In Pakistan, people are so afraid of speaking against the military or its intelligence services that they often use code, such as tapping one’s shoulder to indicate decorative brass or by referring to “the establishment.” While the country has a facade of democracy, the top generals keep a tight hold on politics, the media, and dissent.


New York ban on gravity knives upheld by U.S. appeals court

New York ban on gravity knives upheld by U.S. appeals court A federal appeals court on Friday upheld the constitutionality of New York state's ban on gravity knives, which can be opened to a locked position with a one-handed flick of the wrist. By a 3-0 vote, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected claims by three Manhattan plaintiffs that the ban was vague and could trap unsuspecting people who want to buy, sell or own common folding knives. The decision is a defeat for the artist John Copeland and art dealer Pedro Perez, both arrested for violating the ban, and Native Leather Ltd, a Greenwich Village retailer that agreed to test its knives and submit to inspections to avoid prosecution.


No drugs, no alcohol in U.S. celebrity chef Bourdain's body when he died: prosecutor

No drugs, no alcohol in U.S. celebrity chef Bourdain's body when he died: prosecutor U.S. celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain, who killed himself in a French hotel room earlier this month, had no narcotics or alcohol in his body when he died, a local prosecutor said on Friday. Bourdain, host of CNN's food-and-travel-focused "Parts Unknown" television series, was 61. "No trace of narcotics, no trace of any toxic products, no trace of medicines, no trace of alcohol," prosecutor Christian de Rocquigny told Reuters.


Showers soak much of U.S. Corn Belt; more storms next week

Showers soak much of U.S. Corn Belt; more storms next week By Julie Ingwersen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Rains soaked portions of the U.S. Corn Belt this week, swamping fields in South Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa, and more storms are expected early next week ahead of a warm-up, meteorologists said Friday. The wet and warm outlook is generally favorable for U.S. corn and soybean crops overall, forecasters said, despite areas of flooding. The National Weather Service posted flood warnings Friday in northern Illinois, northwest Iowa and neighboring southeast South Dakota, where some areas received 5 to 6 inches (12 to 15 cm) of rain over the last seven days.


Supreme Court restricts police on cellphone location data

Supreme Court restricts police on cellphone location data By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday imposed limits on the ability of police to obtain cellphone data pinpointing the past location of criminal suspects in a major victory for digital privacy advocates and a setback for law enforcement authorities. In the 5-4 ruling, the court said police generally need a court-approved warrant to get the data, setting a higher legal hurdle than previously existed under federal law. The court said obtaining such data without a warrant from wireless carriers, as police routinely do, amounted to an unreasonable search and seizure under the U.S. Constitution's Fourth Amendment.


Uber car's 'safety' driver streamed TV show before fatal crash: police

Uber car's 'safety' driver streamed TV show before fatal crash: police By Heather Somerville and David Shepardson SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The safety driver behind the wheel of a self-driving Uber car in Tempe, Arizona, was streaming a television show on her phone until about the time of a fatal crash, according to a police report that deemed the March 18 incident "entirely avoidable." A report by the Tempe Police Department said the driver, Rafaela Vasquez, repeatedly looked down and not at the road, glancing up a half second before the car hit Elaine Herzberg, 49, who was crossing the street at night. The report said police concluded the crash, which has dealt Uber Technologies Inc a major setback in its efforts to develop self-driving cars, would have been "entirely avoidable" if Vasquez had been paying attention.


Tesla recycling machine catches fire at Fremont, California campus

Tesla recycling machine catches fire at Fremont, California campus The fire occurred after a cardboard baling machines that is used for recycling overheated, and was contained, Fremont Fire Department Division Chief Diane Hendry said on Friday. In a tweet earlier this week, Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk touted a new tent on the campus that is being used for the production of the Model 3. The Tesla spokeswoman said the production tent was not affected by the fire.


A judge in California, the daughter of immigrants, will rule on Trump’s family detention policy

A judge in California, the daughter of immigrants, will rule on Trump’s family detention policy U.S. District Court Judge Dolly M. Gee will rule on Attorney General Jeff Sessions's motion in federal court requesting “limited emergency exemptions” to the longstanding rules governing the detention of immigrant children apprehended at the border that essentially seeks the court’s blessing to suspend compliance with a settlement that limits where ICE can detain immigrants younger than 18 — and for how long.


With DACA phasing out, college graduates like Edder Martinez face an uncertain future

With DACA phasing out, college graduates like Edder Martinez face an uncertain future Mexico-born Edder Martinez, 27, who crossed the border with his mother when he was 5 years old and recently graduated from college, is just one of many in the U.S. affected by the DACA phase-out.


Key Democrat: Trump advisers 'lied through their teeth' when testifying about Russia contacts

Key Democrat: Trump advisers 'lied through their teeth' when testifying about Russia contacts A top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee says he believes longtime Donald Trump adviser Roger Stone and an associate “lied through their teeth” when they testified before his panel and they both should be investigated for perjury. Swalwell focused on recent revelations that, at Caputo’s instigation, Stone met during the 2016 campaign in Florida with a Russian immigrant and sometime FBI informant named Henry Greenberg who offered “dirt” on Hillary Clinton.


ERCOT expects Texas power demand to break June record in heat wave

ERCOT expects Texas power demand to break June record in heat wave (Reuters) - Homes and businesses in Texas are expected to set a daily electricity consumption record for June on Friday as consumers crank up their air conditioners to escape a brutal heat wave, according to the operator of most of the state's power grid. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, forecast demand will peak at 68,374 MW on Friday, topping the record for the month, 67,887 MW, set on June 1. Summer came early to Texas this year.


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