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Bank of America to stop financing operators of private prisons, detention centers

Bank of America to stop financing operators of private prisons, detention centers JPMorgan Chase & Co and Wells Fargo & Co. made similar commitments to stop financing private prison companies earlier this year. Activism against the financing of private prisons has increased amid tightening immigration policies under U.S. President Donald Trump and concerns about detention conditions. Private detention centers account for about two-thirds of people held by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, S&P Global Ratings estimated last year.


EXCLUSIVE-U.S. FAA says it identifies new potential risk on 737 MAX

EXCLUSIVE-U.S. FAA says it identifies new potential risk on 737 MAX The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has identified a new potential risk that Boeing Co must address on its 737 MAX before the grounded jet can return to service, the agency told Reuters on Wednesday. The risk was discovered during a simulator test last week, sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. The new issue means Boeing will not conduct a certification test flight until July 8 at the earliest, the sources said, and the FAA will spend at least two to three weeks reviewing the results before deciding whether to return the plane to service.


EXCLUSIVE-U.S. FAA says it identifies new potential risk on 737 MAX

EXCLUSIVE-U.S. FAA says it identifies new potential risk on 737 MAX The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has identified a new potential risk that Boeing Co must address on its 737 MAX before the grounded jet can return to service, the agency told Reuters on Wednesday. The risk was discovered during a simulator test last week, sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. The new issue means Boeing will not conduct a certification test flight until July 8 at the earliest, the sources said, and the FAA will spend at least two to three weeks reviewing the results before deciding whether to return the plane to service.


Russia to withdraw military 'technicians' from Venezuela on Wednesday: embassy

Russia to withdraw military 'technicians' from Venezuela on Wednesday: embassy Russia is withdrawing its military "technicians" from crisis-stricken Venezuela on Wednesday, the Caracas embassy said, as President Vladimir Putin gears up for talks with US leader Donald Trump later this week. The move comes three months after Moscow drew US ire by deploying around 100 military experts in Venezuela after Washington indicated it could use force to oust beleaguered President Nicolas Maduro, a Russian ally. "The Il-62 plane which is carrying Russian technicians who have been in Venezuela over the past months… is leaving Caracas for Moscow on June 26," the Russian embassy in Caracas said in a post on Facebook.


Conservative U.S. Justice Gorsuch again sides with liberals in criminal case

Conservative U.S. Justice Gorsuch again sides with liberals in criminal case The court ruled that the right of Andre Haymond to face a jury trial under the U.S. Constitution's Sixth Amendment was violated when a judge unilaterally imposed an additional prison sentence after Haymond violated the terms of his supervised release. Haymond originally was sentenced to just over three years in prison and 10 years of supervised release after being convicted by a jury in 2010 of possessing pornographic images involving children. After completing his sentence, Haymond was found in 2015 in possession of 59 additional images.


NATO agrees response to new Russia missile

NATO agrees response to new Russia missile NATO on Wednesday agreed a package of political and military measures to boost its defences against a controversial new Russian missile system. The alliance will review its air and missile defences, along with its intelligence and surveillance programmes, unless Moscow abandons its 9M729 ground-launched cruise missiles by August 2. The US and NATO say Russia is breaching the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty with the missile and endangering peace in Europe.


Supreme Court’s Conservative Justices Weigh Scrapping Another Precedent

Supreme Court’s Conservative Justices Weigh Scrapping Another Precedent (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority may be ready to overturn a longstanding precedent for the third time in recent weeks -- perhaps foreshadowing the vulnerability of its rulings on abortion rights.The justices will rule as early as Wednesday on a business-backed bid to overturn decades-old decisions that give federal agencies broad power to say what their regulations mean.The case is one of eight rulings due before the justices’ term ends this week. The court also plans to rule on gerrymandered voting maps and the Trump administration’s bid to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.Another precedent-toppling ruling would extend a pattern that already has liberal justices sounding alarms. They’ve hinted that the five conservative justices may be eyeing the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling, which legalized abortion nationwide.“Today’s decision can only cause one to wonder which cases the court will overrule next,” dissenting Justice Stephen Breyer wrote last month when the court overruled a 1979 precedent to say that states are immune from private suits in another state’s courts.“Well, that didn’t take long,” Justice Elena Kagan wrote 39 days later when the court overturned part of a 1985 ruling and said people could go directly to federal court to claim that a government regulation unconstitutionally took private property without compensation. “Now one may wonder yet again.”Both of those were 5-4 decisions, with Chief Justice John Roberts and the other Republican appointees -- Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh -- in the majority.Ducking AbortionSo far, the court has largely sidestepped the explosive topic of abortion. In May, the court turned away Indiana’s bid to bar abortions based on a fetus’s race or gender or a risk of genetic disorder -- an appeal that could have raised new doubts about Roe. The justices did uphold a separate Indiana law requiring clinics to bury or cremate fetal remains.The court could provide new signals about its intentions on abortion this week. The justices are due to say whether they’ll consider Alabama’s effort to ban the most common method used for women in their second trimester of pregnancy.The court under Roberts has actually overturned precedents at a slower rate than previous courts, says Jonathan Adler, a constitutional law professor at Case Western Reserve School of Law. Before this term started, the Roberts court had issued only 13 rulings that overturned a precedent, according to data from the Government Printing Office, he says.But Roberts, who took his seat in 2005, has never had a conservative majority as reliable as the one he got when the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh to succeed the retired Anthony Kennedy.“It is certainly possible either that the court may become more aggressive going forward or that the cases in which the court reconsiders precedents will have a greater ideological uniformity,” Adler said.Adler is among those urging the court to overturn a 1997 ruling, Auer v. Robbins, that requires judges to defer to a federal agency’s interpretation of its own regulations, as long as its approach is reasonable.Business groups say that ruling, along with a related 1945 decision, leads to onerous and unpredictable rules and leaves companies vulnerable to penalties when an agency shifts its thinking. Defenders of the rulings say they give agencies flexibility to account for changing circumstances.Religion and GerrymandersThe regulation, property-rights and sovereign-immunity cases are among the four appeals this term that squarely asked the justices to topple at least one precedent.The fourth one split the court in an unusual way last week. The court had been asked to overturn a rule that lets states and the federal government file separate criminal charges over the same conduct without violating the Constitution’s ban on double jeopardy.The court refused on a 7-2 vote, reaffirming precedents dating to the middle of the 19th century. Alito’s majority opinion said the case for keeping precedents “grows in proportion to their antiquity.” An unlikely pair of justices -- Gorsuch and liberal Ruth Bader Ginsburg -- dissented.Three other cases have raised questions about precedents, though less directly. In backing hunting rights in Wyoming for the Crow Indian Tribe, a majority that included the four liberals and Gorsuch said an 1896 ruling had previously been “repudiated.”In ruling last week that a 40-foot cross could remain in a Maryland public intersection as a war memorial, a majority of justices criticized, without overruling, a 1971 decision that set up a three-part test for assessing whether government support for religion goes too far.And the gerrymandering cases could topple a 1986 ruling that said voting maps could be challenged as too partisan, though the justices in that case couldn’t agree on a standard for doing so. Paul Clement, the lawyer defending a Republican-drawn North Carolina congressional map, told Roberts during arguments in March that the court might need to overturn that ruling.‘Jolt to the System’At the center of it all is Roberts, who said in his 2005 Senate confirmation hearing that overruling a precedent is a “jolt to the legal system.” He has tended to take a multi-step approach toward questioning a precedent, signaling concern in a preliminary case before voting to overturn it altogether.“His favorite methodology seems to be to essentially chip away at cases in various steps so that the day that the case is actually overruled it’s really not even news, it’s been coming for a couple of years,” Clement said last month at a symposium co-hosted by the conservative Heritage Foundation and Bradley Foundation.Writing the majority opinion in the property-rights case last week, Roberts said the 1985 Williamson County v. Hamilton Bank ruling relied on “exceptionally ill-founded reasoning,” had been repeatedly criticized by justices over the years and had proven “unworkable in practice.”It’s still too early to judge how Roberts will act toward precedents now that he has a stronger conservative majority, Adler said.“Like a lot of people I’m curious if the chief is going to become more aggressive, but I’m not willing to say that we can be sure of that yet,” said Adler.To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Laurie Asséo, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Supreme Court’s Conservative Justices Weigh Scrapping Another Precedent

Supreme Court’s Conservative Justices Weigh Scrapping Another Precedent (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority may be ready to overturn a longstanding precedent for the third time in recent weeks -- perhaps foreshadowing the vulnerability of its rulings on abortion rights.The justices will rule as early as Wednesday on a business-backed bid to overturn decades-old decisions that give federal agencies broad power to say what their regulations mean.The case is one of eight rulings due before the justices’ term ends this week. The court also plans to rule on gerrymandered voting maps and the Trump administration’s bid to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.Another precedent-toppling ruling would extend a pattern that already has liberal justices sounding alarms. They’ve hinted that the five conservative justices may be eyeing the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling, which legalized abortion nationwide.“Today’s decision can only cause one to wonder which cases the court will overrule next,” dissenting Justice Stephen Breyer wrote last month when the court overruled a 1979 precedent to say that states are immune from private suits in another state’s courts.“Well, that didn’t take long,” Justice Elena Kagan wrote 39 days later when the court overturned part of a 1985 ruling and said people could go directly to federal court to claim that a government regulation unconstitutionally took private property without compensation. “Now one may wonder yet again.”Both of those were 5-4 decisions, with Chief Justice John Roberts and the other Republican appointees -- Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh -- in the majority.Ducking AbortionSo far, the court has largely sidestepped the explosive topic of abortion. In May, the court turned away Indiana’s bid to bar abortions based on a fetus’s race or gender or a risk of genetic disorder -- an appeal that could have raised new doubts about Roe. The justices did uphold a separate Indiana law requiring clinics to bury or cremate fetal remains.The court could provide new signals about its intentions on abortion this week. The justices are due to say whether they’ll consider Alabama’s effort to ban the most common method used for women in their second trimester of pregnancy.The court under Roberts has actually overturned precedents at a slower rate than previous courts, says Jonathan Adler, a constitutional law professor at Case Western Reserve School of Law. Before this term started, the Roberts court had issued only 13 rulings that overturned a precedent, according to data from the Government Printing Office, he says.But Roberts, who took his seat in 2005, has never had a conservative majority as reliable as the one he got when the Senate confirmed Kavanaugh to succeed the retired Anthony Kennedy.“It is certainly possible either that the court may become more aggressive going forward or that the cases in which the court reconsiders precedents will have a greater ideological uniformity,” Adler said.Adler is among those urging the court to overturn a 1997 ruling, Auer v. Robbins, that requires judges to defer to a federal agency’s interpretation of its own regulations, as long as its approach is reasonable.Business groups say that ruling, along with a related 1945 decision, leads to onerous and unpredictable rules and leaves companies vulnerable to penalties when an agency shifts its thinking. Defenders of the rulings say they give agencies flexibility to account for changing circumstances.Religion and GerrymandersThe regulation, property-rights and sovereign-immunity cases are among the four appeals this term that squarely asked the justices to topple at least one precedent.The fourth one split the court in an unusual way last week. The court had been asked to overturn a rule that lets states and the federal government file separate criminal charges over the same conduct without violating the Constitution’s ban on double jeopardy.The court refused on a 7-2 vote, reaffirming precedents dating to the middle of the 19th century. Alito’s majority opinion said the case for keeping precedents “grows in proportion to their antiquity.” An unlikely pair of justices -- Gorsuch and liberal Ruth Bader Ginsburg -- dissented.Three other cases have raised questions about precedents, though less directly. In backing hunting rights in Wyoming for the Crow Indian Tribe, a majority that included the four liberals and Gorsuch said an 1896 ruling had previously been “repudiated.”In ruling last week that a 40-foot cross could remain in a Maryland public intersection as a war memorial, a majority of justices criticized, without overruling, a 1971 decision that set up a three-part test for assessing whether government support for religion goes too far.And the gerrymandering cases could topple a 1986 ruling that said voting maps could be challenged as too partisan, though the justices in that case couldn’t agree on a standard for doing so. Paul Clement, the lawyer defending a Republican-drawn North Carolina congressional map, told Roberts during arguments in March that the court might need to overturn that ruling.‘Jolt to the System’At the center of it all is Roberts, who said in his 2005 Senate confirmation hearing that overruling a precedent is a “jolt to the legal system.” He has tended to take a multi-step approach toward questioning a precedent, signaling concern in a preliminary case before voting to overturn it altogether.“His favorite methodology seems to be to essentially chip away at cases in various steps so that the day that the case is actually overruled it’s really not even news, it’s been coming for a couple of years,” Clement said last month at a symposium co-hosted by the conservative Heritage Foundation and Bradley Foundation.Writing the majority opinion in the property-rights case last week, Roberts said the 1985 Williamson County v. Hamilton Bank ruling relied on “exceptionally ill-founded reasoning,” had been repeatedly criticized by justices over the years and had proven “unworkable in practice.”It’s still too early to judge how Roberts will act toward precedents now that he has a stronger conservative majority, Adler said.“Like a lot of people I’m curious if the chief is going to become more aggressive, but I’m not willing to say that we can be sure of that yet,” said Adler.To contact the reporter on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Laurie Asséo, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


View Photos of the 2020 Chevrolet Silverado HD

Palestinian Windfall Hinges on Political Moves, U.S. Envoy Says

Palestinian Windfall Hinges on Political Moves, U.S. Envoy Says (Bloomberg) -- The financial bonanza the Trump administration envisions for the Palestinians is unlikely to materialize unless there’s progress toward resolving the 70-year-old conflict with Israel, according to a top U.S. envoy.“If we’re not going to get traction on the political aspect of the deal, I’m not sure we would take the time to try to get pledges," U.S. special envoy Jason Greenblatt said at an economic conference to drum up support for the U.S. plan in Bahrain on Wednesday. “A lot of pledges get made to help the Palestinian people. Many of them are never actually paid anyway. But if we do see traction, then absolutely.”President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner, promoted the economic component of his long-promised initiative for Middle East peace with the workshop in Bahrain this week, where he called for about $50 billion in proposed investments in the Palestinian territories and neighboring countries that host refugees. The more divisive political aspect of the plan isn’t expected to be revealed until later this year.His economic road map, published days before the Bahrain event, makes little mention of how to resolve the political troubles at the heart of conflict. High-profile speakers from government and business mostly sidestepped those thorny questions to focus on general themes of governance and entrepreneurship as the key to prosperity for the Palestinians.But Greenblatt’s comments appeared to undermine the Trump administration’s contention that an economic strategy should come before Kushner’s still-delayed political proposal on core issues, from the fate of Palestinians’ bid for statehood to the status of Jerusalem.“Gaza is a mess. There is no meaningful way to help the people of Gaza until we figure out how to stop the terrorist attacks from Hamas. That’s pure and simple,” he told reporters on the sidelines of the conference. It’s “hard to predict where the Palestinian Authority is going, hard to predict what Hamas is going to do.”Near CollapseThe U.S. effort comes as the West Bank-based Palestinian Authority is near financial collapse. Gaza, which is run by the Islamist Hamas group, is straining under an Israeli and Egyptian blockade that has lasted more than a decade as well as more recent sanctions by the Palestinian Authority. Its economy relies heavily on aid, unemployment is high, travel is difficult and power cuts happen daily.The White House wanted to use the event in Bahrain to persuade other countries to pick up the tab for economic development and put the heat on Palestinians to accept the blueprint.Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he expects to collect about $4 billion in pledges this week and that the U.S. was willing to revise the plan if that would help it win international support.“We want this to become an international plan,” he said. “We’re looking for changes. We’re looking for additions. We’re looking for buy-in.”Though it boasted big names including International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde and Blackstone Group CEO Stephen Schwarzman, the conference met with less-than-expected interest from the business community. Only a fraction of more than 1,000 business leaders invited attended, according to a person familiar with the matter.Gulf Arab ministers said their countries, which have helped to rebuild Gaza after successive wars with Israel, were willing to support any efforts that would help the Palestinian people -- provided these were acceptable to them.“The way to make the people on the ground believe is to give them hope that this will be sustainable,” said Mohammed Al Sheikh, a Saudi minister of state.Spurned by PalestiniansPalestinian leaders, however, have spurned Kushner’s proposal as an effort to bribe them into accepting an eventual Trump plan that will favor Israel. Kushner said the Palestinian leadership discouraged all but a small contingent of entrepreneurs and investors from attending. Palestinian leaders broke off contact with the U.S. administration after Trump’s decision to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, part of which they want as the capital of a future state, and to close down their diplomatic mission in Washington.The other main beneficiaries of a potential deal were also conspicuous by their absence. Israeli and Palestinian officials weren’t invited. Neighbors Lebanon and Syria didn’t go. Jordan and Egypt, which stand to gain billions of dollars under Kushner’s vision, sent mid-level delegations, suggesting expectations were low.Unlikely Settler-Palestinian Duo Eyes Big Bucks at Bahrain MeetIn his opening remarks on Tuesday, Kushner gave a sales pitch reflecting his background as real estate developer, displaying a video that conjured up modern buildings and lush greenery sprouting from impoverished Palestinian villages.The high-concept video of an economic oasis wasn’t a new technique for the Trump administration: In 2018, the president showed North Korea’s Kim Jong Un a mock movie trailer on an iPad that depicted alternative futures for his regime -- of warfare and ruin or skyscrapers under construction if he gave up his nuclear arsenal.The sole Palestinian to speak at the event was Ashraf Jabari, a controversial businessman who faced criticism at home for attending an event many Palestinians see as an effort to buy out their aspiration for statehood.Visibly sweating, he tried to steer the conversation toward politics as the moderator repeatedly interrupted.“Honestly, we support and demand an independent Palestinian country on the lands that Israel occupied in 1967,” Jabari said. “This is the goal of every Palestinian.”Speaking to reporters at the end of the event, Kushner acknowledged the need for a political solution between Israel and the Palestinians to ground his vision but said the two tracks were separate, even though he’s overseeing both.“The people who worked on the economic plan are not aware of what the political plan is,” he said. “So what we tried to do this today is keep this devoid of politics, because again, we have the political plan which we’ll talk about at the right time.”\--With assistance from Lin Noueihed, Ivan Levingston, Sammy Criscitello, Saud Abu Ramadan, Sarah Algethami, Donna Abu-Nasr and David Wainer.To contact the reporter on this story: Vivian Nereim in Manama at vnereim@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Lin Noueihed at lnoueihed@bloomberg.net, Larry LiebertFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


Saudi envoy blasts UN expert's report on Khashoggi killing

Saudi envoy blasts UN expert's report on Khashoggi killing In what amounted to a face-off at the U.N's top human rights body, Ambassador Abdulaziz Alwasil insisted that special rapporteur Agnes Callamard had failed to follow proper procedures and used flawed sourcing in her 101-page report made public last week. "Accusations have been launched, and fingers have been pointed — (she is) supporting herself on non-credible articles or sources," he told the Human Rights Council, in Arabic through a U.N. interpreter.


Saudi envoy blasts UN expert's report on Khashoggi killing

Saudi envoy blasts UN expert's report on Khashoggi killing In what amounted to a face-off at the U.N's top human rights body, Ambassador Abdulaziz Alwasil insisted that special rapporteur Agnes Callamard had failed to follow proper procedures and used flawed sourcing in her 101-page report made public last week. "Accusations have been launched, and fingers have been pointed — (she is) supporting herself on non-credible articles or sources," he told the Human Rights Council, in Arabic through a U.N. interpreter.


Saudi envoy blasts UN expert's report on Khashoggi killing

Saudi envoy blasts UN expert's report on Khashoggi killing In what amounted to a face-off at the U.N's top human rights body, Ambassador Abdulaziz Alwasil insisted that special rapporteur Agnes Callamard had failed to follow proper procedures and used flawed sourcing in her 101-page report made public last week. "Accusations have been launched, and fingers have been pointed — (she is) supporting herself on non-credible articles or sources," he told the Human Rights Council, in Arabic through a U.N. interpreter.


Photos of the Euro-Spec Ford Puma

Photos of the Euro-Spec Ford Puma

Photos of the Euro-Spec Ford Puma

These $76 Sony headphones have almost too much bass, and they last for 30 hours per charge

These $76 Sony headphones have almost too much bass, and they last for 30 hours per charge If you want a pair of wireless headphones with a ton of bass that won't break the bank, the Sony MDRXB650BT/B Extra Bass Bluetooth Headphones are exactly what you've been looking for. They cost a fraction of what you would pay for most wireless on-ear or over-ear headphones from Sony, and yet they deliver killer sound quality with all the bass you can handle. They also last for up to 30 hours per charge, which is nuts!Here are the highlights from the product page: * Connect and stream music easily with Bluetooth and NFC. Connectivity Technology: Wireless * Feel the powerful, clear sound of EXTRA BASS * Keep the music pumping with up to 30 hours of battery life * Listen in comfort and style with cushioned ear pads * Enjoy hands-free calls with a built-in mic


Apple Watches could have onboard cameras in the future, according to new patent filing

Apple Watches could have onboard cameras in the future, according to new patent filing Apple submitted a patent to the US Patent and Trademark Office suggesting it's looking into allowing future Apple Watches to see the world around you.


‘Trump is responsible’: Democrats, celebrities and activists react to photo of drowned father and toddler

‘Trump is responsible’: Democrats, celebrities and activists react to photo of drowned father and toddler Democratic presidential hopefuls, activists, celebrities and Mexican politicians were among those who responded with horror to a widely shared photograph of a drowned El Salvadorean man and his 23-month-old daughter.The bodies of Oscar Alberto Martinez Ramirez and his daughter Valeria were found face down in the Rio Grande, which lies along part of the US-Mexico border.The toddler was found tucked into her father’s t-shirt. Her arm was draped across his neck, suggesting that she was clutching him in her final moments.Julia Le Duc, a journalist, took the photograph. It was later published in La Jornada, a Mexican newspaper.The deaths prompted furious reactions from some politicians, who blamed the Trump administration for the humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border.Many openly linked the White House’s anti-immigration policies to the tragedy.“Trump is responsible for these deaths,” said Beto O’Rourke, who is campaigning for the Democratic presidential nomination.“As his administration refuses to follow our laws – preventing refugees from presenting themselves for asylum at our ports of entry – they cause families to cross between ports, ensuring greater suffering & death. At the expense of our humanity, not to the benefit of our safety.”Kamala Harris, a California senator also running for the nomination, struck a similar tone.“These families are often fleeing extreme violence,” she said on Twitter.“And what happens when they arrive? Trump says ‘Go back to where you came from.’ That is inhumane.“Children are dying,” she added."This is a stain on our moral conscience.”> There’s nothing criminal about seeking a better life for your family. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again now—we have to do the right thing and decriminalize border crossing.> > — Cory Booker (@CoryBooker) > > June 26, 2019Cory Booker, senator for New Jersey, said: "We should not look away. These are the consequences of Donald Trump’s inhumane and immoral immigration policy. This is being done in our name.“There’s nothing criminal about seeking a better life for your family.”Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the prime minister of Mexico, said the incident was “very regrettable”. Mexico has come under pressure from the US in recent months to reduce the number of people crossing the border.“We have always denounced that as there is more rejection in the United States, there are people who lose their lives in the desert or crossing [the river],” Mr Obrador said.The White House is yet to comment on the Rio Grande tragedy.Many Central Americans have fled their home countries after a surge in violence and poverty in the region, prompting Mr Trump to declare an emergency at the border.Some groups, like Ramirez and his family, hope to seek asylum in the US.The migrants retain the right to present themselves at the border and request asylum, but the Trump administration’s “metering” policy has drastically reduced the number of applications heard each day from dozens to just a handful at some ports of entry.Asylum applications can take months to process. A Mexican official said Mr Ramirez and his family had visited the US consulate in the city of Matamoros on Sunday. It is unclear what occurred in the consulate but the family decided to try and cross the Rio Grande later the same day.Other Democrats commenting on the deaths included Rashida Tlaib, a Michigan congresswoman who entered the Capitol in January.“This monster and his heartless administration must be held accountable,” she said, referring to Mr Trump.Mexican newspapers have compared the image of the father and daughter to a 2015 photograph of Alan Kurdi, a three-year-old Syrian boy who drowned in the Mediterranean.The 2015 image helped to bring worldwide attention to the refugee crisis in Europe.It remains to be seen if the Rio Grande deaths will have a similar impact but awareness of the image has spread beyond Washington, with celebrities and activists among those sharing it online.Several urged social media users not to “look away” from the graphic photograph.“To those who say, ‘well, they shouldn’t have come here illegally’— why does this idea of an arbitrary line matter so much to you that you don’t care if people are dying when they cross said arbitrary line?!?!” Alyssa Milano, an actress, said.Bradley Whitford, an actor best known for his role in The West Wing, shared the image of Mr Ramirez and Valeria in a post on his Twitter account.He captioned it with a quote from the New Colossus, a sonnet about immigrants. The poem is mounted on the Statue of Liberty, which has historically served as a symbol of welcome for migrant communities arriving in the US.“Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,” Mr Whitford wrote.“The wretched refuse of your teeming shore, Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door.”Additional reporting by agencies


Millions of people are traveling to New York for WorldPride. Why are some opting to skip?

Millions of people are traveling to New York for WorldPride. Why are some opting to skip? WorldPride, the annual LGBTQ celebration, is in New York this year -- and LGBTQ people of all stripes are making the global trek.


Millions of people are traveling to New York for WorldPride. Why are some opting to skip?

Millions of people are traveling to New York for WorldPride. Why are some opting to skip? WorldPride, the annual LGBTQ celebration, is in New York this year -- and LGBTQ people of all stripes are making the global trek.


Global chipmakers rally on Micron's upbeat results, Huawei shipments

Global chipmakers rally on Micron's upbeat results, Huawei shipments The company also said it had resumed some shipments to Huawei Technologies after reviewing a U.S. ban on selling products to the Chinese smartphone maker. Micron shares were up 10%, while those of Nvidia Corp, Intel Corp, Xilinx Inc and Advanced Micro Devices rose between 2% and 6%. U.S. chipmakers suspended shipments to Huawei after the U.S. government on May 15 added the world's biggest telecoms equipment maker and 68 affiliates to an "Entity List", banning it from acquiring components and technology from U.S. firms without government approval.


Today’s top deals: $17 LED light strip, $30 true wireless earbuds, $25 Wi-Fi extender, SanDisk microSD deals, more

Today’s top deals: $17 LED light strip, $30 true wireless earbuds, $25 Wi-Fi extender, SanDisk microSD deals, more When we say we've managed to find some truly unbelievable daily deals for today's roundup, we're not kidding. Highlights include a multi-color LED light strip that can do everything Philips Hue's $70 model can do for just $17 when you use the coupon code 7NELDEDF at checkout, $40 true wireless earbuds with touch control for just $29.99 with coupon code I7QWMF5M, the faster version of Amazon's best-selling Wi-Fi range extender for just $24.99 after a $17 discount and a $5 coupon, an UltraPot that's basically an Instant Pot on steroids for only $59.99, $8 off Super Mario Maker 2 for Nintendo Switch if you preorder before its release on Friday, two Sonos Play:1 speakers and a $30 Amazon gift card for just $298, huge discounts on SanDisk Ultra microSD cards in all sizes, an Instant Pot cookbook with 500 recipes for only $3.99, the first big discount on AirPods 2 with Wireless Charging Case, white Philips Hue bulbs for under $12 a piece, 20 rolls of toilet paper for $17, and more. Check out all of today's best bargains below.


What Is the Roth IRA 5-Year Rule?

What Is the Roth IRA 5-Year Rule? Established in 1997, the Roth individual retirement account has long been a favored option for retirement savings due to its promise of tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Not all Roth IRA withdrawals are tax-free. After opening and contributing to a Roth IRA, you'll need to wait five years to begin tax-free withdrawals of investment earnings.


What Is the Roth IRA 5-Year Rule?

What Is the Roth IRA 5-Year Rule? Established in 1997, the Roth individual retirement account has long been a favored option for retirement savings due to its promise of tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Not all Roth IRA withdrawals are tax-free. After opening and contributing to a Roth IRA, you'll need to wait five years to begin tax-free withdrawals of investment earnings.


What Is the Roth IRA 5-Year Rule?

What Is the Roth IRA 5-Year Rule? Established in 1997, the Roth individual retirement account has long been a favored option for retirement savings due to its promise of tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Not all Roth IRA withdrawals are tax-free. After opening and contributing to a Roth IRA, you'll need to wait five years to begin tax-free withdrawals of investment earnings.


View Photos of the 2020 Audi Q7

View Photos of the 2020 Audi Q7

View Photos of the 2020 Audi Q7

The biggest Porsche Taycan teasers in one place

The biggest Porsche Taycan teasers in one place For over a year, Porsche has been teasing the production version of the Mission E concept via spec reveals, shadowed videos, and obscure photographs of the Taycan in camouflage. Since the company debuted the Mission E concept EV in 2015, rumors have been pointing towards the development of a production version of the model and, sure enough, that model was announced two years later in June 2018. Since the Taycan was officially reported, Porsche has been releasing teasers every couple months about the car's development progress.


U.A.E. Splits With U.S. Over Blame for Oil Tanker Attack in May

U.A.E. Splits With U.S. Over Blame for Oil Tanker Attack in May (Bloomberg) -- The United Arab Emirates appeared to distance itself from U.S. claims that pinned attacks on oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz on Iran.“Honestly we can’t point the blame at any country because we don’t have evidence,” Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah Bin Zayed Al Nahyan said on Wednesday in Moscow. “If there is a country that has the evidence, then I’m convinced that the international community will listen to it. But we need to make sure the evidence is precise and convincing.”While an investigation by the U.A.E., Norway and Saudi Arabia concluded that a “state actor” was most likely behind the incident in May, no nation was singled out. Still, U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton has said that Iran was almost certainly responsible.The attack predated the pair of strikes in the Gulf of Oman this month that the U.S. has also blamed on Iran. Vessels were targeted off the U.A.E. coast in May as they made their way toward the Strait of Hormuz, the world’s foremost oil shipping chokepoint.Iran’s foreign minister has labeled Bolton and the leaders of the U.A.E., Israel and Saudi Arabia as the “B-team” that’s prodding President Donald Trump into going to war with the Islamic Republic. Trump slapped new sanctions on Tehran this week.With tensions on the rise across the Middle East, the U.A.E.’s top diplomat tried to change tack after talks in Moscow with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov.“We are in a region that is tense and important for the world and we don’t want more tension,” said Sheikh Abdullah.\--With assistance from Zainab Fattah and Verity Ratcliffe.To contact the reporter on this story: Abbas Al Lawati in Dubai at aallawati6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shaji Mathew at shajimathew@bloomberg.net, Paul Abelsky, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


U.A.E. Splits With U.S. Over Blame for Oil Tanker Attack in May

U.A.E. Splits With U.S. Over Blame for Oil Tanker Attack in May (Bloomberg) -- The United Arab Emirates appeared to distance itself from U.S. claims that pinned attacks on oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz on Iran.“Honestly we can’t point the blame at any country because we don’t have evidence,” Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah Bin Zayed Al Nahyan said on Wednesday in Moscow. “If there is a country that has the evidence, then I’m convinced that the international community will listen to it. But we need to make sure the evidence is precise and convincing.”While an investigation by the U.A.E., Norway and Saudi Arabia concluded that a “state actor” was most likely behind the incident in May, no nation was singled out. Still, U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton has said that Iran was almost certainly responsible.The attack predated the pair of strikes in the Gulf of Oman this month that the U.S. has also blamed on Iran. Vessels were targeted off the U.A.E. coast in May as they made their way toward the Strait of Hormuz, the world’s foremost oil shipping chokepoint.Iran’s foreign minister has labeled Bolton and the leaders of the U.A.E., Israel and Saudi Arabia as the “B-team” that’s prodding President Donald Trump into going to war with the Islamic Republic. Trump slapped new sanctions on Tehran this week.With tensions on the rise across the Middle East, the U.A.E.’s top diplomat tried to change tack after talks in Moscow with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov.“We are in a region that is tense and important for the world and we don’t want more tension,” said Sheikh Abdullah.\--With assistance from Zainab Fattah and Verity Ratcliffe.To contact the reporter on this story: Abbas Al Lawati in Dubai at aallawati6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shaji Mathew at shajimathew@bloomberg.net, Paul Abelsky, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


U.A.E. Splits With U.S. Over Blame for Oil Tanker Attack in May

U.A.E. Splits With U.S. Over Blame for Oil Tanker Attack in May (Bloomberg) -- The United Arab Emirates appeared to distance itself from U.S. claims that pinned attacks on oil tankers near the Strait of Hormuz on Iran.“Honestly we can’t point the blame at any country because we don’t have evidence,” Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah Bin Zayed Al Nahyan said on Wednesday in Moscow. “If there is a country that has the evidence, then I’m convinced that the international community will listen to it. But we need to make sure the evidence is precise and convincing.”While an investigation by the U.A.E., Norway and Saudi Arabia concluded that a “state actor” was most likely behind the incident in May, no nation was singled out. Still, U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton has said that Iran was almost certainly responsible.The attack predated the pair of strikes in the Gulf of Oman this month that the U.S. has also blamed on Iran. Vessels were targeted off the U.A.E. coast in May as they made their way toward the Strait of Hormuz, the world’s foremost oil shipping chokepoint.Iran’s foreign minister has labeled Bolton and the leaders of the U.A.E., Israel and Saudi Arabia as the “B-team” that’s prodding President Donald Trump into going to war with the Islamic Republic. Trump slapped new sanctions on Tehran this week.With tensions on the rise across the Middle East, the U.A.E.’s top diplomat tried to change tack after talks in Moscow with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov.“We are in a region that is tense and important for the world and we don’t want more tension,” said Sheikh Abdullah.\--With assistance from Zainab Fattah and Verity Ratcliffe.To contact the reporter on this story: Abbas Al Lawati in Dubai at aallawati6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Shaji Mathew at shajimathew@bloomberg.net, Paul Abelsky, Mark WilliamsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.


UPDATE 1-Oman to open embassy in Palestinian territories' West Bank -foreign ministry

UPDATE 1-Oman to open embassy in Palestinian territories' West Bank -foreign ministry Oman said on Wednesday it was planning to open a new diplomatic mission in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and that a delegation from its foreign ministry would go to Ramallah for that purpose. The Gulf state made its announcement as Washington launched an economic plan it says will be a foundation for Israeli-Palestinian peace but which Palestinians and many other Arabs dismiss as pointless without a political solution. "In line with the Sultanate's support for the brotherly Palestinian people, it has decided to open a new diplomatic mission for Palestine at the level of embassy," the foreign ministry said in Twitter post.


UPDATE 1-Oman to open embassy in Palestinian territories' West Bank -foreign ministry

UPDATE 1-Oman to open embassy in Palestinian territories' West Bank -foreign ministry Oman said on Wednesday it was planning to open a new diplomatic mission in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and that a delegation from its foreign ministry would go to Ramallah for that purpose. The Gulf state made its announcement as Washington launched an economic plan it says will be a foundation for Israeli-Palestinian peace but which Palestinians and many other Arabs dismiss as pointless without a political solution. "In line with the Sultanate's support for the brotherly Palestinian people, it has decided to open a new diplomatic mission for Palestine at the level of embassy," the foreign ministry said in Twitter post.