This Website Maybe For Sale – Click Here -

WHOLESALE Resource Center

Source Match Wholesale Industry News

America Movil to pay $1.1 million to settle FCC probe

The America Movil logo is seen at the reception area in the company's offices in Mexico City WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Puerto Rico Telephone Company and its parent company, America Movil of Mexico, will pay $1.1 million to resolve a U.S. investigation over foreign ownership levels, the Federal Communications Commission said on Tuesday.


VW agrees to buy back diesel vehicles, fund clean air efforts

File photo of VW sign outside a Volkswagen dealership in London By David Shepardson and Joel Schectman WASHINGTON (Reuters) - German automaker Volkswagen AG will pay as much as $15.3 billion after admitting it cheated on U.S. diesel emissions tests for years, agreeing to buy back vehicles from consumers and provide funding that could benefit makers of cleaner technologies. A deal formally filed by the Justice Department on Tuesday will provide the largest-ever automotive buyback offer in the United States. The proposed consent decree confirmed that VW will set aside $10.033 billion to cover buybacks or potential fixes for diesel cars and sport utility vehicles that used illegal software to defeat government emissions tests.


Starship will test its autonomous delivery robot in Washington, DC this fall

Starship will test its autonomous delivery robot in Washington, DC this fall Starship — the company behind the adorable, six-wheeled delivery robot we met this year at Mobile World Congress — has received approval from the Washington, DC Department of Transportation to start testing a delivery program as early as this September.


IKEA recalls 36 million chests, dressers after six deaths

Flags and the company's logo are seen outside of an IKEA Group store in Spreitenbach Swedish furniture retailer IKEA Group is recalling almost 36 million chests and dressers in the United States and Canada that have been linked to the deaths of six children, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said on Tuesday. The recall covers six models of MALM chests or dressers manufactured from 2002 to 2016, as well as about 100 other families of chests or dressers, it said. Two U.S. toddlers died in separate 2014 incidents when MALM chests fell over on them.


Confirmed: Game of Thrones has 15 episodes left, at the most

The sixth season of  Game of Thrones  just wrapped up, with the 60th overall episode of the series having been a glorious season finale — likely one of the best episodes in the entire series. Fans are eagerly waiting to see what’s going to happen next, but season 7 won't debut until next year. And HBO showrunners confirmed what we already feared: There are just 15 episodes left in the series at most, meaning season 7 and season 8 will have less than 10 episodes each. DON'T MISS:  Would you rather a black or blue iPhone 7? This is what they’re going to look like In an interview with Deadline , David Benioff and D.B Weiss talked about season 6’s finale and how it sets up for the upcoming season. But they also confirmed what we dreaded, that there are only 15 episodes left in the series, at most. “It’s two more seasons we’re talking about,” Benioff said when asked about how long Game of Thrones will continue. “From pretty close to the beginning, we talked about doing this in 70-75 hours, and that’s what we’ll end up with. Call it 73 for now.” Benioff doesn’t mention the number of episodes in the upcoming two seasons. But since an episode lasts almost an hour, with the season finale being slightly longer, we can easily conclude that 73 to 75 hours means we’re looking at a lot less than 20 episodes for the upcoming two seasons. Benioff also said that Game of Thrones is unlike any other TV show in this regard. It’s not trying to score more episodes than it needs. “We’re trying to tell one cohesive story with a beginning, middle and end,” Benioff explained. “As Dan [Weiss] said, we’ve known the end for quite some time, and we’re hurtling towards it. Those last images from the show that aired last night showed that. Daenerys is finally coming back to Westeros; Jon Snow is king of the North and Cersei is sitting on the Iron Throne. And we know the Night King is up there, waiting for all of them. The pieces are on the board now. Some of the pieces have been removed from the board, and we are heading toward the end game.” He continued, “The thing that has excited us from the beginning, back to the way we pitched it to HBO is, it’s not supposed to be an ongoing show, where every season it’s trying to figure out new story lines. We wanted it to be one giant story, without padding it out to add an extra 10 hours, or because people are still watching it. We wanted to something where, if people watched it end to end, it would make sense as one continuous story. We’re definitely heading into the end game now.” The full interview with the creators of Game of Thrones is available at this link .

The Latest: Clinton says nothing new in Benghazi report

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton pauses while speaking at a Rainbow PUSH Women's International Luncheon at the Hyatt McCormick in Chicago, Monday, June 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the U.S. presidential campaign. (all times EDT):


The Nubia Z11 is another phone with an edge-to-edge display

The Nubia Z11 is another phone with an edge-to-edge display Chinese smartphone maker Nubia has announced the Z11, a smartphone with an edge-to-edge display and the sequel to last year's bezel-free flagship Z9. The Z11 comes with a 5.5-inch 1008p display, which isn't that great in 2016 but largely makes up for it with a strong lineup of specs:Snapdragon 820 SoCAndroid Marshmallow 6.0.1 with Nubia UI 4.016MP rear camera with OIS, PDAF, and f/2.0 aperture8MP front camera with f/2.4 aperture and a wide-angle lensedual SIM, VoLTE, fingerprint sensor, HiFi sound3000mAh battery with fast charging


Netflix is splitting the first season of The Get Down into two parts

Netflix is splitting the first season of The Get Down into two parts Netflix's newest series, Baz Luhrmann's The Get Down, is getting split in two for its first season. Polygon reports that the streaming network will release the first six episodes of the show on August 12th, while the remaining six episodes will air at some point in 2017. The Get Down is a musical drama set in 1970s South Bronx, and will feature "a lot of disco, a lot of clothes-on thrusting, a few guns, and frustration." Breaking Bad alum Giarcarlo Esposito and Jaden Smith are set to star alongside an ensemble of young actors to depict the period. While Netflix's new talk show Chelsea airs three nights a week, Netflix hasn't ever released a show in narrative chunks.


Katzenberg sued over 'side deal' to Comcast-DreamWorks merger

DreamWorks CEO Katzenberg poses at the Children's Defense Fund-California 24th Annual "Beat the Odds" Awards in Culver City By Tom Hals WILMINGTON, Del. (Reuters) - Jeffrey Katzenberg, DreamWorks Animation SKG Inc's chief executive, has been hit with a proposed class action lawsuit over what a minority shareholder called an "extraordinarily valuable" side deal he struck as part of the $3.8 billion sale of the studio to Comcast Corp . Comcast, the owner of NBCUniversal and the largest U.S. cable distributor, agreed in April to pay $41 in cash per DreamWorks share and Katzenberg agreed to vote his controlling stock for the deal, assuring investor approval.


Everything coming to Netflix, Amazon Prime, and HBO Now in July

Everything coming to Netflix, Amazon Prime, and HBO Now in July CBS StudiosThe battle between Netflix and Amazon may go on for decades to come, but Amazon strikes a distinct blow this month as it wrestles control of a core film series away from Netflix: Star Trek — the old ones, I mean. Not the new ones you love to complain about.But this month’s film and TV additions aren’t a total wash for Netflix. For one, it’s picking up all seasons of Gilmore Girls worldwide (they’ve already been available in the US) to prep viewers for the new specials coming later this year. It’s also picking up a pair of film series, Back to the Future and Lethal Weapon. ...


Amazon's Alexa Gets Voice-Enabled Skills

Amazon's Alexa Gets Voice-Enabled Skills It's easier than ever to make Amazon's smart assistant, Alexa, even more brilliant. Now, just by saying "Alexa, enable Lyft," you can add the ability to order a ride with your voice. Amazon also revamped how the app is organized, so it's easier to search by categories such as Smart Home or Lifestyle.


Facebook Slideshow Movie Maker to Rival Apple's Photos

Facebook Slideshow Movie Maker to Rival Apple's Photos If you loved the slideshows from Facebook's Moments app but only use the social network's core app, you're in luck -- Facebook is bringing the feature to its mobile news feed. A video released by Facebook makes it look simple. When you post five or more photos or videos to your timeline within 24 hours, you'll be presented with a pre-made video at the top of your feed, where you can modify it with a bunch of different themes.


Here’s how to disable apps that could make your Twitter account vulnerable

Here’s how to disable apps that could make your Twitter account vulnerable On Monday, hacking group OurMine gained access to the Quora account of Google CEO Sundar Pichai. Quora has the ability to connect with a user’s Twitter account — as do thousands of other platforms. Because Pichai had granted Quora permission to tweet from his Twitter account, the hackers were able to send messages from the handle of Google’s leader without actually hacking the account.


Oracle's cloud business takes lead in Latin America

The Oracle Corporation campus is shown in this aerial photo in Redwood City, California By Brad Haynes SAO PAULO (Reuters) - Oracle Corp is selling more cloud-based business software than traditional licensed products in Latin America, executives said on Tuesday, underscoring how remote computing has spurred demand from smaller businesses in new markets. Chief Executive Officer Mark Hurd said the cloud business, which stores enterprise software and data on remote servers, lets Oracle sell to clients without the budget for hardware or qualified staff, which can be tough to find in emerging markets. "One of the benefits of cloud is that you can now offer capabilities to a much broader set of customers," Hurd said at an event in São Paulo.


Why everyone’s biggest complaint about the iPhone 7 is all wrong

Over the past couple of weeks, the tech world has borne witness to a contentious and fiery debate surrounding Apple’s alleged plans to remove the traditional 3.5mm headphone jack from the upcoming iPhone 7. Understandably, not everyone is on board with Apple’s rumored decision to kick a ubiquitous standard that has been around for decades to the curb. And while some in the tech community are taking a ‘wait and see’ approach, others have come out with guns ablazin’. Last week, for example, Nilay Patel of The Verge penned a widely circulated piece wherein he calls Apple’s abandonment of the headphone jack “user hostile and stupid." But here’s the thing: Apple isn’t stupid. Apple may be many things — arrogant, paranoid about product leaks, and selfish are just a few adjectives that come to mind — but stupid isn’t a word that really fits. As a result, I believe that there’s a strong chance the 3.5mm headphone jack that we’ve all come to know and love isn’t going to completely disappear once the iPhone 7 hits store shelves. Will one or more iPhone 7 models ship without a headphone jack? It’s entirely possible. But the idea that Apple, in one fell swoop, will completely abandon the 3.5mm headphone jack with a single iPhone release just doesn’t add up. Here’s why. DON'T MISS:  Would you rather a black or blue iPhone 7? This is what they’re going to look like One of the core things Apple cares about is the narrative that surrounds its products. The unveiling and subsequent release of each successive iPhone model is incredibly well-structured and thoughtfully constructed. The product unveilings themselves are highly rehearsed and extremely polished. Meanwhile, the accompanying marketing campaigns behind each new iPhone model are expertly designed to highlight the features that Apple deems to be the most important. By this yardstick alone, if Apple were to release a slate of new iPhone 7 models with no headphone jack, it would completely lose control of the narrative it prizes so dearly. It’s not even July and the debate surrounding Apple’s alleged ambivalence towards the headphone jack has already engendered an insanely passionate debate. And while that debate, for now, has mostly circulated within nerdy tech circles, it will inevitably spill over, if not explode into the mainstream if the headphone jack is, in fact, tossed by the wayside. With rumors that the iPhone 7 will be largely devoid of particularly marketable or exciting new features, do you really think Apple wants the top talking point surrounding its next-gen iPhone to be the company’s controversial decision to remove the headphone jack? Apple may be arrogant at times, but do you really think that the company is willing to risk a headphone-gate type controversy from overshadowing the iPhone 7’s release? It would be one thing if Apple with the iPhone 7 could encourage users to focus on a crazy new display technology or an incredible new feature like TouchID -- but with no wild new features on the radar, omitting the headphone jack on the iPhone 7 would come to define the device itself. Furthermore, there’s no telling how the public will react to such a design shift. Do people really think Apple is stupid enough to release a selection of new iPhone models without even an option for a headphone jack? If Apple truly believes that a world devoid of the 3.5mm headphone jack is where the future lies, it’s going to strongly encourage users to agree while still providing users who disagree with an iPhone purchasing option. Apple may be arrogant, but it's not blind. Compounding matters is that the iPhone 7 is already shaping up to be an extremely important and strategic product release. Recall that Apple in 2016 experienced its first year over year sales drop in iPhone history. Consequently, now isn’t the best time for Apple to unleash what may very well be its riskiest iPhone design yet. Apple needs the iPhone 7 to be a success, and abandoning the headphone jack altogether is entirely too risky, especially given that the device will reportedly lack any crazy new features that might otherwise overshadow the device’s glaring lack of a port that has been around for decades. All that said, I believe there's more than a strong chance that at least one new iPhone 7 model will feature the beloved 3.5mm headphone jack. Notably, some leaked iPhone 7 photos which surfaced last week support this claim. For those inclined to support Apple’s alleged plan to drop the 3.5mm headphone jack, a commonly raised argument is that Apple has a long history of abandoning legacy technologies, with the original Bondi Blue iMac shipping without a floppy disk being a prime example. On the surface, such comparisons may seem astute, but a deeper examination reveals that such analogies are misplaced for reasons that we’ll address in more detail in a subsequent post. In the meantime, consider this: Apple has no problem kicking legacy technologies to the curb when better alternatives exist. But from a usability, reliability, durability and efficiency point of view, what's the superior alternative to the headphone jack? Bluetooth headphones as a replacement is laughable, to say the least. And as for, lightning headphones? Well, they already exist. In other words, where's the value proposition? Apple may very well want to phase out the headphone jack for upcoming design considerations -- say the rumored edge to edge display on the iPhone 7s or iPhone 8 -- but such a move will likely be staggered. Much how Apple didn't completely abandon the optical drive across its entire product line when it released the MacBook Air, I believe that the headphone jack will live on with the iPhone 7, though perhaps in a more limited form. Perhaps the regular 4.7-inch iPhone 7 will sport a headphone jack while the larger iPhone 7 Pro will do away with it completely. For a design shift this big, Apple is smart enough to recognize that a staggered rollout is the way to go. Besides, a world where the headphones that ship with every iPhone aren't compatible with any shipping Mac product seems decidedly unlike Apple. My prediction? If Apple really wants to get rid of the headphone jack, it's going to ease us into the idea slowly with the iPhone 7 before completely removing it with the iPhone 7s or iPhone 8.

Shout at the devil: the confusing world of talking to computers

Shout at the devil: the confusing world of talking to computers Microsoft calls it "conversation as a platform." Google says it wants to computers to have an "ongoing two-way dialogue" with their users. Digital assistants that we talk to — Siri, Alexa, Cortana — are already commonplace, but creating computers that talk back will mean something extra: using machine learning to offer users prompts and suggestions. "Our goal with artificial intelligence is to build systems that are better than people at perception," said Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg.


Bose helps kids build their own speaker with a $149 kit

Wall Street climbs after Brexit-sparked selloff

Specialist traders work inside a post on the floor Morgan Stanley , Bank of America , Citigroup and JPMorgan were all up more than 2.5 percent while Goldman Sachs rose 1 percent. Global equities commenced a downward spiral on Friday as investors scrambled to safe havens such as the yen and gold after the referendum threw questions over the future of the European Union.


EU regulators readying third Google antitrust charge: sources

File photo of a Google search page is seen through a magnifying glass in this photo illustration taken in Berlin Alphabet's Google may face a third EU antitrust charge as soon as next month, this time focusing on its revenue mainstay AdWords ad placement service, three people familiar with the matter said on Tuesday. The world's most popular Internet search engine is already under fire from the European Commission for promoting its shopping service at the expense of rivals and for using its Android mobile operating system for smartphones to squeeze out competitors. The Commission has asked Google rivals to share information related to search advertising with the tech giant, a step suggesting the EU competition enforcer could be poised to hit Google with a fresh charge, the sources said.


EU regulators readying third Google antitrust charge: sources

File photo of a Google search page is seen through a magnifying glass in this photo illustration taken in Berlin Alphabet's Google may face a third EU antitrust charge as soon as next month, this time focusing on its revenue mainstay AdWords ad placement service, three people familiar with the matter said on Tuesday. The world's most popular Internet search engine is already under fire from the European Commission for promoting its shopping service at the expense of rivals and for using its Android mobile operating system for smartphones to squeeze out competitors. The Commission has asked Google rivals to share information related to search advertising with the tech giant, a step suggesting the EU competition enforcer could be poised to hit Google with a fresh charge, the sources said.


Terrifying video shows a passenger plane on fire

No no no no no no no. No. Flying on commercial airplanes is already nerve-racking enough as it is, but you're never going to want to set foot on an airplane again after seeing this video. The footage shows Singapore Airlines flight SQ368, which took off for Milan, Italy shortly after 2:00AM local time early Monday morning before turning around and landing back in Singapore. It's a good thing the pilot did turn around, and you're about to find out why. DON'T MISS:  Meet your favorite new Google search feature After taking off from Changi Airport in Singapore en route to Milan, pilots got an engine oil warning that prompted them to turn the flight around and head back to Singapore. The plane made it all the way back to Changi and landed safely before an engine burst into flames. Here's footage of the fire, which was published by The Associated Press and posted by Gizmodo : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0anPv8aFmgM A person who was not aboard Singapore Airlines flight SQ368 but who was at Changi Airport at the time of the incident captured and posted more footage, noting that oil leaked into the engine, causing the fire pictured. https://twitter.com/AlifAdele/status/747240102116491265 Reuters reported that crews at the airport were able to contain the fire within just a few minutes, and no passengers were injured. The Singapore Airlines flight had 222 passengers and 19 crew on board. "Passengers disembarked through stairs and were transported to the terminal building by bus. Passengers will be transferred to another aircraft which is expected to depart for Milan later today," the airline said in a statement.

Giant helium field could inflate the world’s dwindling supply

Giant helium field could inflate the world’s dwindling supply When the US privatized the National Helium Reserve in 1996, it began selling off the nation’s helium reserves cheaply, — which depleted the world’s largest supply of the gas. Now, researchers have claimed to have discovered a major new field in Tanzania, which could provide a much-needed boost to global reserves. Researchers from Oxford and Durham Universities collaborated with with Helium One, a private Norwegian helium exploration company, to search for helium using an experimental method.


Can charging hubs be stylish?

Can charging hubs be stylish? Most charging hubs are the antithesis of style. An Italian company wants to change the fate of the poor charging hub with its new Woodie Hub. The Woodie’s outlets fit four different types of plugs, including the US’s. It's also built for Qi wireless charging and has USB ports.


Facebook just redesigned the like button

Facebook just redesigned the like button Facebook's like button, the familiar blue icon that is found on millions of pages around the web, is getting a new look. The company is introducing a redesigned version of the icon that ditches Facebook's company logo in favor of a thumbs-up icon. The move is part of a broader redesign of Facebook's social plugin buttons that makes them flatter and more distinct. Previously, the buttons for liking and sharing both used Facebook's corporate logo.


Facebook add-ons save and share stories in Chrome

Game of Thrones' 69-minute season six finale was its most-watched episode ever

Game of Thrones' 69-minute season six finale was its most-watched episode ever 8.9 million people watched the Game of Thrones season six finale live on HBO on Sunday night. Last week, HBO told USA Today that the average weekly viewer total for season six was 23.3 million — about 15 percent higher than it was for season five. As it stands, the only show that regularly trounces Game of Thrones is AMC's The Walking Dead — last year's season finale brought in 14.1 million live viewers.


Jeremy Clarkson unveils the logo for The Grand Tour, the old Top Gear crew's new show

Jeremy Clarkson unveils the logo for The Grand Tour, the old Top Gear crew's new show Jeremy Clarkson, noted bully and former host of popular BBC car show Top Gear, just tweeted out the logo for his new show The Grand Tour. The new show, which premieres on Amazon Prime Instant Video this fall, will feature him and his fellow former Top Gear hosts James May and Richard Hammond galavanting around the world, driving cars, and engaging in their special brand of wacky hijinks. Clarkson was forcibly Brexited from the old Top Gear show more than a year ago after he assaulted a producer, but it didn't take long for his fellow hosts to follow him away from the BBC.


Clinton's tech policy includes student loan relief for startups

Clinton's tech policy includes student loan relief for startups

Don't forget to floss: App tells you how nice your smile is

Don't forget to floss: Upcoming app tells you how nice your smile is In addition to rating your gnashers, the app tells you how trustworthy, elegant and friendly your smile makes you look.


Don't forget to floss: App tells you how nice your smile is

Don't forget to floss: Upcoming app tells you how nice your smile is In addition to rating your gnashers, the app tells you how trustworthy, elegant and friendly your smile makes you look.


Google Project Fi now siphons service from US Cellular coverage, too

Sprint and T-Mobile fuel Google's wireless telephony service, and now US Cellular lends its strength to a growing Fi.

Google Project Fi now siphons service from US Cellular coverage, too

Sprint and T-Mobile fuel Google's wireless telephony service, and now US Cellular lends its strength to a growing Fi.

​Ride service Lyft may be shopping itself around

Lyft Line carpool steers its way to Denver, Seattle Lyft has partnered with investment bank Qatalyst Partners. Could it mean investment from car manufacturers, or a sale?


​Ride service Lyft may be shopping itself around

Lyft Line carpool steers its way to Denver, Seattle Lyft has partnered with investment bank Qatalyst Partners. Could it mean investment from car manufacturers, or a sale?


Western Digital announces new 4TB My Passport drives

Western Digital announces new 4TB My Passport drives Western Digital's My Passport Ultra hard drives are now available with 4TB of storage, the company announced today. Previously the drive was only available with up to 3TB of storage so it's a nice improvement for power users who eat up a ton of storage. The company says it is also releasing 4TB versions of its My Passport Ultra Metal and My Passport for Mac drives before the fall, but there's no indication on how much those will cost yet.


The first episode of the new Transformers animated series is available now

The first episode of the new Transformers animated series is available now Optimus Prime awaits you on YouTube in a four-part preview to the upcoming series "Combiner Wars," which is aimed at grown-ups.


The first episode of the new Transformers animated series is available now

The first episode of the new Transformers animated series is available now Optimus Prime awaits you on YouTube in a four-part preview to the upcoming series "Combiner Wars," which is aimed at grown-ups.


Illustrated Bachelorette Recap: these are all of my boyfriends

Illustrated Bachelorette Recap: these are all of my boyfriends To kick things off, Wells gets his first one-on-one date card, and he reveals to the guys that he still hasn't kissed JoJo. Everyone knows that on The Bachelorette, weakness is grounds for relentless bullying. Wells and JoJo go on an awkward date through Buenos Aires, and he's sweating through his shirt trying to find the perfect moment to lay a juicy one on his would-be forever love.


Blue Origin breaks ground on new Florida rocket factory

Blue Origin breaks ground on new Florida rocket factory Jeff Bezos announced today that his private spaceflight venture, Blue Origin, has begun construction on the new rocket manufacturing facility the company is building in Florida. The facility, which will span 750,000 square feet, will be used to build the company’s future orbital rocket, according to an email Bezos sent out today. Currently, Blue Origin’s only working vehicle, the New Shepard, can travel to and from suborbital space but cannot achieve orbit.


This is the Ghostbusters theme song cover you deserve

This is the Ghostbusters theme song cover you deserve Ray Parker Jr.'s Ghostbusters theme song might've been mortally wounded by the Fall Out Boy version released last week, but it was only a matter of time before someone brought it back to life. Four Japanese comedians — Tomochika, Oniyakko Tsubaki, Naomi Watanabe, and Shizuyo Yamasaki — recorded their own take on the 1984 classic for Sony Pictures Japan's own Ghostbusters campaign, and it restores all of the goofy joy that made the original sparkle. Goodbye, aggro riffs! Fare thee well, regrettable Missy Elliott verse! Happy trails, Patrick Stump!


Microsoft revamps pushy Windows 10 upgrade process

Microsoft revamps pushy Windows 10 upgrade process

U.S. first-quarter GDP revised up, Brexit risk to outlook

People shop at The Grove mall in Los Angeles U.S. economic growth slowed in the first quarter but not as sharply as previously estimated, with gains in exports and software investment partially offsetting weak consumer spending. Gross domestic product increased at a 1.1 percent annual rate, rather than the 0.8 percent pace reported last month, the Commerce Department said on Tuesday in its third GDP estimate. "The test comes in the next few months as the turbulence in financial markets may affect consumers' behavior and also weigh on business investment," said Ryan Sweet, senior economist at Moody's Analytics in West Chester, Pennsylvania.


Evernote raises prices of its paid plans, limits device sharing on free tier

Evernote raises prices of its paid plans, limits device sharing on free tier Evernote today announced a new suite of pricing for its paid plans and new limitations for its free service. Evernote Basic remains a free-to-use service, but it is now limited to two devices per account. Evernote recently made passcode locking a free feature, but that likely won't placate the Basic users accustomed to accessing their notes on a variety of devices at the same time.


Where Volkswagen's $5 billion environmental payout is going

Where Volkswagen's $5 billion environmental payout is going As part of its landmark $14.7 billion settlement with US regulators, Volkswagen will be shelling out cash to improve the land it sullied with its excess diesel emissions.


Where Volkswagen's $5 billion environmental payout is going

Where Volkswagen's $5 billion environmental payout is going As part of its landmark $14.7 billion settlement with US regulators, Volkswagen will be shelling out cash to improve the land it sullied with its excess diesel emissions.


Clinton campaign proposes new ‘startup visa’ and student loan breaks for entrepreneurs

Clinton campaign proposes new ‘startup visa’ and student loan breaks for entrepreneurs In most cases, the plan continues policies put in place by President Obama and FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, but also puts forward a number of unexpected immigration and student debt programs aimed at spurring entrepreneurship within the US. Clinton’s immigration proposal is particularly notable, offering a "startup visa" for foreign entrepreneurs who want to move to the US to start a business. "Immigrant entrepreneurs would have to obtain a commitment of financial support from U.S. investors before obtaining the visa, and would have to create a certain number of jobs and reach performance benchmarks in order to pursue a green card," the proposal reads.


'Avatar' mobile game landing ahead of film sequels

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 1, 2011, file photo, a figure of Jake Sully's avatar character from the movie "Avatar," is on display at the Experience Music Project in Seattle. Before moviegoers return to Pandora, they'll be able visit the exotic alien world from "Avatar" on their smartphones. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File) LOS ANGELES (AP) — Before moviegoers return to Pandora, they'll be able visit the exotic alien world from "Avatar" on their smartphones.


A look at Steve Jobs’ biggest failures as Apple CEO

It's hard to believe that it's 2016 and the phrase This would have never happened if Steve was still alive is still being used. Most recently, Mashable referenced Apple's overhaul of the Apple Watch UI as a solution to a problem that would have never have happened if Steve Jobs was still at the helm of Apple. Is this true? Perhaps. Obviously there's no way to know for sure, but the underlying and frustrating problem with the  This would have never happened under Steve Jobs narrative is that it effectively presupposes that the Apple co-founder was a flawless visionary who never oversaw the release of shoddy software or underwhelming hardware. DON'T MISS: Leaked iPhone 7 photos point to intriguing new camera design No company is perfect, to be sure, but one of Apple's strengths has long been its willingness to concede when it's made a mistake and throw all of its weight behind fixing said mistake. Which is to say, Apple's willingness to overhaul the Apple Watch UI, I believe, is a positive insofar as it indicates that the company is happy to admit defeat in order to improve the overall utility of its products. But returning to Steve Jobs for a moment, he wasn't immune to making decisions that later required correction. So while he was an innovative genius he was still a human being who made no shortage of missteps along the way. Now given that critics and pundits often find it all too easy to mercilessly and, often times, needlessly attack Tim Cook as a lesser version of Steve Jobs, we thought it was a good time to open up the history books and highlight some of the more curious Steve Jobs decisions and product releases that occurred under his command. Jobs was against the App Store The App Store completely changed the way we interact with our mobile devices and created an economy unto itself in the process. The App Store today is a huge money-making machine, not to mention a key selling point for the iPhone. But interestingly enough, Steve Jobs initially opposed releasing an iPhone SDK and rolling out an App Store. When discussing the original iPhone, Jobs tried to convince the world that Web 2.0 and Ajax apps were all that developers and end-users needed. The full Safari engine is inside of iPhone. And so, you can write amazing Web 2.0 and Ajax apps that look exactly and behave exactly like apps on the iPhone. And these apps can integrate perfectly with iPhone services. They can make a call, they can send an email, they can look up a location on Google Maps. And guess what? There’s no SDK that you need. You’ve got everything you need if you know how to write apps using the most modern web standards to write amazing apps for the iPhone today. So developers, we think we’ve got a very sweet story for you. In fact, Jobs' reluctance to move ahead with an SDK and a bona fide App Store was so strong that a number of Apple employees and board members were actively trying to persuade Jobs to change his mind. According to Walter Isaacson's Jobs biography, Apple board member Art Levinson called Jobs "a half dozen times to lobby for the potential of the apps." Phil Schiller also tried to persuade Jobs to open up the iPhone to third-party developers. "Jobs at first quashed the discussion," Isaacson notes, "partly because he felt his team did not have the bandwidth to figure out all the complexities that would be involved in policing third-party app developers.” Thankfully, Jobs eventually saw the competitive advantage that the App Store would provide and changed his mind. When the App Store opened up for business in July of 2008, it became an immediate hit. iPod Hi-Fi Apple in February 2006 announced a speaker system dubbed the iPod Hi-Fi, a forgettable product to say the least. From the outset, it was clear that Apple was simply trying to capitalize on the success of the iPod which was still thriving at the time. The iPod Hi-Fi was a simple concept -- play music directly from your iPod -- that worked decently well. The sound quality respectable but was not in line with the premium price tag ($349) Apple attached to it. Not surprisingly, audiophiles couldn't help but rip the product to shreds. Less than two years after its release, Apple unceremoniously and quietly discontinued the iPod Hi-Fi after sales never managed to take off. Oddly enough, brand new and never opened packages of the iPod-HiFi currently sell for over $1,000 on Amazon, though we can't imagine that someone would actually buy it. MobileMe Apple has never been the best when it comes to cloud-based services. Suffice it to say, if you're frustrated with iCloud today, thank your lucky stars that you never had to withstand the horror that was MobileMe. From the get-go, MobileMe was fraught with problems. What Apple hoped would be a seamless way for users to check email, locate their devices, share photos and more was anything but. Indeed, Steve Jobs reportedly went into a tirade following a less than stellar review of the service from Walt Mossberg, reportedly telling Apple engineers that they ”tarnished Apple’s reputation” and that they “should hate each other for having let each other down.” In fact, the fallout from the initial rollout of MobileMe was so severe that the initial team behind it was reportedly disbanded. What's more, MobileMe's failure prompted Jobs to hand control of Apple's cloud and Internet-related services to a then up and coming employee named Eddy Cue. Hockey Puck Mouse Arguably one of Apple's strangest design decisions, the company's ballyhooed Bondi Blue iMac shipped with a circular mouse design that was quickly dubbed the hockey puck mouse . Despite Jobs' assertions to the contrary, the iMac's translucent mouse was not ergonomically friendly. It was frustrating to control, clunky, and far from a beacon of efficiency. Almost comically, Jobs at one point touted the peripheral as "the best mouse you'll ever use." At best, most iMac users tolerated the mouse. Mercifully, Apple in 2000 replaced it with the optical Apple Pro Mouse. G4 Cube Apple's famed G4 Cube wasn't an inherent failure. The machine itself was favorably reviewed and featured a slick design that completely reimagined the way a computer should look and feel. Nonetheless, a daunting $1,599 price tag coupled with the fact that a monitor had to be purchased separately kept most G4 Cubes on the shelf. Trusting Eric Schmidt It seems like ancient history now, but it's funny to look back at the original iPhone introduction and see former Google CEO Eric Schmidt up on stage praising Apple. At the time, Steve Jobs boasted that the iPhone was a good five years ahead of the competition. Of course, we now know that the iPhone introduction prompted Google's Android team to completely re-think its approach to creating a mobile OS. Yet even as the years passed on by and the tea leaves increasingly started to point to Google becoming Apple's top competitor, Eric Schmidt remained a member on Apple's board of directors. By August of 2009, Jobs and co. finally wised up and realized that the inherent conflict of interest of having Schmidt on the board was not worth keeping up. On August 3, 2009, Apple issued a press release announcing Schmidt's resignation. “Unfortunately, as Google enters more of Apple’s core businesses, with Android and now Chrome OS, Eric’s effectiveness as an Apple Board member will be significantly diminished, since he will have to recuse himself from even larger portions of our meetings due to potential conflicts of interest," Steve Jobs said at the time. "Therefore, we have mutually decided that now is the right time for Eric to resign his position on Apple’s Board.”